Chinese Medicine and Arthritis
Tallahassee Chinese Medicine - and Community Acupuncture
RSS Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Categories

Acupuncture
Acupuncture in Tallahassee
Arthritis
Cancer
Chronic Pain
Colds Flu Allergies
Community Acupuncture
Depression
Diabetes
Exercise
Fertility
Fibromyalgia
Headaches
Health
Health Tallahassee
Heart Disease
Lifestyle
Lyme Disease
Massage
Meditation
Migraines
Nutrition
Pregnancy
Stroke
Thyroid
Weight Loss
Wellness
Women's Health

Archives

August 2017
July 2017
April 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
November 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
August 2011
July 2011
May 2011

powered by

Dr. Craig's Blog

Chinese Medicine and Arthritis

Chinese Medicine and Arthritis

According to the wisdom of Oriental medicine, what causes arthritis is sometimes different from conventional understanding.   These causes may seem unusual to you, 
but pay attention to these causes. You can stop problems for yourself in the future if you  understand and avoid them.  There are certain conditions that make you pre­disposed to getting arthritis: 

• Overwork (or play) that puts a strain on your spine or joints 
• Repetitive motion  (from work, sports, et. al.) or Excessively poor diet 
• Getting run down physically 
• Accidents / trauma 
• Excess emotions

 Basically, these conditions weaken your body so it's vulnerable to other factors.  Once you are pre­disposed to getting arthritis,  there always must be some excess or 
unseasonable exposure to the elements.  This means being exposed to wind, cold or dampness after you are already vulnerable due to the above factors.  

This could include: 
• Jogging in the cold or rain 
• Wearing too little clothing on a windy or cold day 
• Living in a damp basement (or other environment) 
• Leaving your hair wet after showering 
• Wearing wet clothing around after swimming 
• Unseasonable or sudden change of weather 

Sudden change of weather or exposure to wind, cold or dampness, combines with your body's inability to adapt to it leads to  arthritis.  

To avoid causing arthritis in the future: 
• Always dress appropriately for the weather 
• Stay out of excess or unseasonable weather 
• Don't wear damp clothes 
• Avoid work or living situations that are windy, cold or damp 
• Keep yourself healthy and strong so you aren't vulnerable to those conditions 

Food Therapy and Arthritis Oriental medicine puts more emphasis on diet for arthritis than conventional medicine, even though it's seen often as an indirect  cause.  While over­-exposure to the 
elements (cold, damp, etc.) is the an important direct cause, a poor diet leaves you in a  weakened state, more vulnerable to those factors, so it is a very important factor. 

Also, Chinese Medicine does see strong  connection between an acidic condition 
of you blood (acidosis) and arthritis. Eat a diet that avoids acid ­causing foods 
and  strengthens you in a way that leaves you less vulnerable to the "elements." Avoid known acid­causing foods, including: meat, eggs, sugar, citrus fruits, 
alcohol and coffee. 

Chinese medicine also specifically sees a connection between "sour" tasting foods 
and tendon / joint problems. So avoid vinegar,  oranges, grapefruit, pickles, and 
yogurt. 

Increase alkaline foods such as vegetables and miso soup. There are also some behaviors that cause acidity. They are worry, fear,  shallow breathing, not chewing food 
enough, and overexertion.  

To promote optimum health and keep you less vulnerable to developing arthritis in the first place, you want to focus on what to eat, rather than what to avoid (it's easier that way). Here are some main principles that will put you on the right track.  

Eat a diet composed mainly of:  
• Lightly cooked vegetables (a big variety. Only eat small amounts of fruit.  
• Some whole grains (brown rice is good)  
• Small amounts of animal food (more for flavor than as a main course ­ 2 to 3 oz. per day) 
• Drink only room temperature or warm water (some green tea is o.k.) 
• To get the best effects, stay away from everything else as much as possible, 
and try to buy clean, organic produce and  foods without chemicals.  
• Specific foods that are good for arthritis: alfalfa, cabbage, celery, cereal grasses,
cherry, chives, glutathione peroxidase,  grapes, hydrogen peroxide, kombu, omega­3, orange peel, potatoes, purified water, royal jelly, scallions, selenium, sesame oil, spelt, spirulina, soy sprouts, speroxide dismutase, wheat grass, wild blue green algae 

Alfalfa For Arthritis Eating alfalfa for arthritis can also be a good idea. Adding it to your diet is not as 
strong as altering your diet completely, but it's a  common folk remedy and has 
many benefits.  Alfalfa contains lots of minerals (calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium)  that have a neutralizing effect on your blood. Since arthritis is often 
caused by acidosis (an acid condition of the blood), alfalfa can  help reverse or 
prevent that condition. It also has a general detoxifying effect on your body. It is not recommended to use alfalfa  powder. 

Instead, make alfalfa tea: Place 1 ounce of alfalfa in a pot. Cover it with one quart of water. Boil for thirty minutes Strain and drink the quart throughout the  day. Do this for only 2 or 3 weeks, 
then break for a week before starting again.  

Research suggests that 10 to 20% of arthritis sufferers will benefit from using alfalfa, with an nearly total reduction of pain  symptoms. 

Exercise For Arthritis Exercise for arthritis is considered important by both Chinese and conventional medicine. The health benefits of activating your larger muscle groups are only 
beginning to be understood here in the west, although Oriental medicine has 
long known and  promoted these benefits.  

Regular exercise can: 
• Strengthen the muscles surrounding arthritic joints 
• Lessen bone loss 
• Control joint swelling and pain 
• Lubricate the joints  
• Reduce stiffness and pain 
• Decrease fatigue 
• Improve sleep 
• Increase flexibility 
• Increase weight loss (important for overweight arthritis sufferers).  

Not all exercises are the same, though. Some can even cause arthritis. Aerobics, 
weight lifting and jogging are not always good for  the joints, from the perspective 
of Oriental medicine. Walking and biking are usually better choices.  

The absolute best arthritis exercise would be tai chi (or possibly even yoga). They help your overall health, too. 

Tai chi is a gentle  exercise that will: 
• Improve your circulation (important for arthritis) 
• Calm stress (which is one component of pain)  
• Reduce the risk of falls (by almost 48% according to one study) 
• Greatly improve overall health 

If you feel you're in too much pain to start exercise for arthritis, begin with "water exercise". The water reduces the stress on your  joints. Once you've improved your 
strength and mobility, you can move on to other types of exercise.  Considering that some  exercises are tough on the joints, it's impressive that a study showed a 10­week course of tai chi did not aggravate arthritis. You can find tai chi classes locally, 
or use instructional videos found online. 

Hope this helps!  Be well.

Kind Regards,
Dr. Craig
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint