Chinese Medicine and IBS/Ulcerative Colitis/Crohn’s/Chronic Diarrhea
Tallahassee Chinese Medicine - and Community Acupuncture
RSS Become a Fan

Delivered by FeedBurner


Categories

Acupuncture
Acupuncture in Tallahassee
Arthritis
Cancer
Chronic Pain
Colds Flu Allergies
Community Acupuncture
Depression
Diabetes
Exercise
Fertility
Fibromyalgia
Headaches
Health
Health Tallahassee
Heart Disease
Lifestyle
Lyme Disease
Massage
Meditation
Migraines
Nutrition
Pregnancy
Stroke
Thyroid
Weight Loss
Wellness
Women's Health

Archives

August 2017
July 2017
April 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
November 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
December 2014
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
August 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
February 2013
January 2013
November 2012
August 2012
July 2012
June 2012
August 2011
July 2011
May 2011

powered by

Dr. Craig's Blog

Chinese Medicine and IBS/Ulcerative Colitis/Crohn’s/Chronic Diarrhea

Chinese Medicine and IBS/Ulcerative Colitis/Crohn’s/Chronic Diarrhea 

Conventional/Western Diet:

The conventional diet for Irritable Bowel Syndrome focuses on fiber. Studies are not conclusive regarding the effects of fiber on IBS, but here's the general 
consensus: Eat foods (and supplements) high in soluble fiber. Soluble fiber soothes your digestive tract  and normalizes bowel function, preventing both diarrhea 
and constipation. 

 Examples: 
• Oats, oat bran and barley 
• Broccoli, Brussel sprouts, carrots 
• Apples, pears, prunes, peaches 
• Beans and lentils (just about all types)  
• Chick peas and black­eyed peas 
• Fruits such as oranges and apples  
• Vegetables such as carrots  
• Psyllium husk  

Insoluble fiber helps constipation by adding bulk to your stools but, with IBS, you need to pay attention to your reaction. They  may initiate an overreaction of the 
"gastrocolic reflex" (that causes those abdominal spasms). 

Foods high in insoluble fiber include: 
• Vegetables such as green beans and dark green leafy vegetables  
• Fruit skins and root vegetable skins  
• Whole­wheat products  
• Wheat oat  
• Corn bran  
• Seeds & Nuts

 Many foods have both soluble and insoluble fibers. Generally, fruits have more soluble fiber and vegetables more insoluble fiber. 

• Eat regular meals in small amounts.  
• Avoid (or minimize): 
o Red meat o Oily, greasy, fried foods 
o Dairy  
o Chocolate 
o Coffee 
o Alcohol 
o Carbonated drinks 
o Honey 
o Spinach 
o Sesame seeds 
o Apricots o Plums (with the exception of umeboshi plums) 

Chinese Dietary Principles :

Eat a diet of:  
• Fresh, lightly cooked vegetables (a big variety) ­ not raw. This should be the largest part of your diet.  
• Whole grains (but avoid wheat). Eat more vegetables than grains  
• Beans 
• Eat small amounts of animal protein (2 or 3 oz. per day). Think of it as a 
flavoring for your meals, rather than the main  course.  
• Drink room temperature or warm water Limit everything else to only small amounts.  

Some doctors recommend large amounts of fruit for health, however, eating lots of 
fruit can weaken the digestion / elimination for  many people, due to its sweetness.  

Foods should be natural, not processed, and organic whenever possible  

Foods that help treat diarrhea: 
Rice broth, barley broth, blackberry juice, string beans, button mushrooms, sweet potatoes/yams,  sweet rice, adzuki beans, garlic, leeks, crab apples, olives, 
umeboshi plums 

Foods that are especially helpful in treating chronic diarrhea: carrots, buckwheat 

Foods that help treat diarrhea from too much cold (watery stools; copious, clear urine): red pepper, black pepper, cayenne  pepper, cinnamon bark, Chinese ginseng, Korean ginseng, dried ginger, 
nutmeg, chestnut, chicken eggs 

Foods that help treat diarrhea from too much heat (burning sensation with bowel movement): millet congee, tofu, mung beans,  pineapples, persimmons, raspberry leaf 
herbal tea, marjoram herbal tea, peppermint herbal tea, nettle leaf herbal tea 

Additional recommendations 
• Eat cooked and warm foods, not raw or straight out of the fridge  
• Avoid "sweet" tasting food  
• Avoid cold foods and drinks (unless you have cold type diarrhea) 
• Eat very little greasy or oily food  
• Avoid alcohol  
• Avoid dairy  
• Avoid caffeine  
• Avoid yeast  
• Avoid boxed, packaged and processed foods  
• Drink about a teacup of warm water with meals. Green tea is o.k. if your stools 
are not dry, but avoid tea if you have dry  stools (tea is a diuretic ­ it dries you out.)  
• Moderate use of spices like ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg and pepper are ordinarily 
beneficial, but in excess they create too  much "heat" in your intestines, which you 
want to avoid when you have inflamed intestines or dry stools. 
• Asafoetida, coriander and mint are good for people with IBS 
• Coconut is believed to be a good addition to the diet’s of people with Crohn’s 
• Ajowan, cardamom, coriander, and nutmeg are believed to be a good addition for 
people with chronic diarrhea 
• Add foods that are high in soluble fiber 

Avoid:  
• Eating late at night  
• Eating in a hurry  
• Overeating  
• Eating while stressed
Website Builder provided by  Vistaprint